Jim Clifton Gallup

As people within political circles go, the ones who report the numbers of sentiment from the people, namely the pollsters, are usually the safest when it comes to reporting their information. Polls are reflections of sentiment and data, after all, so the people talking about them tend to be empirical.  For Gallup CEO Jim Clifton, that isn’t always the case and now he’s scared.

In his piece titled “The Big Lie: 5.6% Unemployment“, Clifton accused the federal government of making the jobless rates appear better than they really were. He pointed to fact that the people who are worst off – the long-term or permanent unemployed and the severely underemployed – are not counted when they’re the ones who need the help the most. Those with “good jobs” in the eyes of Gallup with 30+ hours of work for a company that provides a regular paycheck, is at a tremendously low rate of 44%.

On CNBC, he recanted a bit of the harshness from his article. He stated categorically that he trusts the numbers and that rather than calling them a lie, he should have said they were simply misleading. Many are saying that his words were forced and that he has somehow been coerced into refining his attacks down to a mild complaint. Others would say that he was just responding to backlash from colleagues or that he had a change of heart.

When he mentions that he has to be clear so that he doesn’t “suddenly disappear” on his way home, he was likely making a joke… or was he? If you watch closely, the precise way that he said everything he was going to say so that it was put on record before jumping back into the role of reporting the dismal truth could lead one to believe that he was putting out a little insurance policy, stating what those coercing him wanted him to say and ending it with a subtle but recorded message reminiscent of Andrew Breitbart, perhaps in hopes of not meeting the same fate.

He played it in a way that was picture perfect. Short enough to be tongue in cheek. Long enough to be memorable. He said what he had to say and then redirected his demeanor. Watch for yourself, then ask if this sounds like a many who’s making a joke or a man who’s getting a message out there just in case.

Jesseb ShilohBusinessConspiracyCorruptionFeaturedFinancialPoliticsAndrew Breitbart,conspiracy,Gallup,government,Jim Clifton,Politics
As people within political circles go, the ones who report the numbers of sentiment from the people, namely the pollsters, are usually the safest when it comes to reporting their information. Polls are reflections of sentiment and data, after all, so the people talking about them tend to be...