NSA Building

Nobody in America has has a realistic expectation of digital privacy. We know they’re spying on us. We’ve replaced the illusion of privacy with the complacency of the masses; we aren’t worried as long as we’re not doing anything too bad, right? That’s the problem and it has allowed the various government agencies to go deeper than anyone could possibly imagine.

It’s no longer simply paranoia, either, even though many in the conspiracy world have believed it to be the case for a long time. Recent revelations from Edward Snowden reveal that most of the things we thought were secure aren’t really safe from the NSA. It also revealed that there are certain types of strong encryption that do seem to be safe, but those things were considered “safe” two years ago. Today, one would be foolish to believe that the powers that be haven’t figured out how to get into any network or connected computer in the world at will.

Spiegel does a very nice job of discussing the issue in-depth. Their recent article is still a bit on the trusting side. They still seem to think that there are certain safe havens. If you have any semblance of a belief that they haven’t made it into every crevice online, you’re not paying attention.

Spiegel:

For the NSA, encrypted communication — or what all other Internet users would call secure communication — is “a threat”. In one internal training document viewed by SPIEGEL, an NSA employee asks: “Did you know that ubiquitous encryption on the Internet is a major threat to NSA’s ability to prosecute digital-network intelligence (DNI) traffic or defeat adversary malware?”

Read more.

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Nobody in America has has a realistic expectation of digital privacy. We know they're spying on us. We've replaced the illusion of privacy with the complacency of the masses; we aren't worried as long as we're not doing anything too bad, right? That's the problem and it has allowed...